The State of Fry Lodge

Two weeks ago, the moving truck arrived at Fry Lodge Lopez to pack and carry away all of our belongings – save what we could fit into a 24-foot RV for two months of life on the road. We’ve become experts at moving over the past three years. Seattle to New York. New York to Lopez. A Seattle apartment. And now, Lopez to Bellingham, with a 1500-mile road trip thrown in for good measure.

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We’re now one week into our ProjectWA summer tour. So far, we’re having a blast. We left Lopez last Sunday and spent one night in our new home in Bellingham – a bit of a tease before spending 50 nights straight in an RV that’s smaller than our new bedroom. We’re savoring every moment of this trip, but we’re also anxious to get to know our new home, “the city of subdued excitement.”

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In the meantime, Fry Lodge is mobile. We’re getting into the RV park routine. Back up slowly. Hook up the water and power. Start the propane. Take down the bikes. Cruise the perimeter. Find out how long the coin-operated showers last. Set up the grill. Wash the dishes with minimal water. Collapse into bed. Repeat.

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We spend anywhere from one to four nights in each RV park. During the days, we take side trips to the towns where I have meetings. When we travel to our next site, we caravan. I take the lead with the RV, while Kristine follows behind in the little red Fiesta. Henry and Ruby trade off between vehicles, which makes music selection a little easier. So far we’ve completely avoided the Interstate. Though I’ve traveled all over Washington during my life, I’ve never been on some of these roads. It’s like Steinbeck’s Travels with Charley, but we don’t have a poodle.

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I like to say that Fry Lodge is a state of mind. This summer, Fry Lodge is the state of Washington. #ProjectWA.

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Fry Lodge Mobile

For nearly two months, starting as soon as the kids are out of school, Fry Lodge is going mobile. For most of the summer we’ll be living in our RV as we travel around the Pacific Northwest. We’re calling it ProjectWA.

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Having never driven, slept in… or emptied the gray water of our own RV, we knew we needed a shake down cruise – to test the systems and familiarize ourselves with RV culture. This weekend, we took our motorhome off island and camped for three nights in the Burlington KOA.

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With the exception of a broken tail light at the very end of our trip, Kristine and I agree that we nailed the shake down cruise. It was just like car camping. Except we had a microwave, hot running water, our own bathroom and comfortable beds to crawl into at the end of the day.

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We were surrounded by other RV families, so Henry and Ruby quickly made friends. They spent most of their time biking around the KOA property, while Kristine and I got acquainted with power, water and sewer hook ups. By the time we rolled out of camp, we felt pretty confident in our RV skills.

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On the way back to the Anacortes ferry terminal, we stopped at the Padilla Bay Bike Trail, where we had a picnic before biking through some beautiful Skagit Valley farmland.

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With the shakedown cruise in our rear view video monitor, we’re looking forward to our two-month summer tour of the Northwest. Members of the Fry Lodge Faithful can follow along at http://www.ProjectWA.org

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Fry Lodge Creativity

Half days of school all week means lots of extra time at home to do all kinds of things. We started the afternoon with logo design for our upcoming summer ProjectWA road trip. Ruby was particularly interested in this assignment. We like her design so much, we’re considering using it for our official ProjectWA tee shirts. I think Ruby has a future in graphic design.

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This afternoon, we moved on to Henry’s science homework, which involved creating a device that would count 60 seconds consistently. Henry and Kristine took on this assignment, using sand from the beach, a funnel and a plastic bottle. After several attempts, they determined the exact amount of sand that would take 60 seconds to fill up the bottle. Well done, Fry Lodge engineers.

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